Nathan Havey, Managing Director,  Thrive Consulting Group  and Co-Founder,  Sum and Substance      Workplace Culture    Conscious Capitalism    Purpose    Conscious Leadership    Leadership Development    Storytelling      FOR BOOKINGS PLEASE CONTACT  Trisha Stezzi (770) 490-5552  Trisha@SignificanceAgency.com    WE REPLY WITHIN 24 HOURS

Nathan Havey, Managing Director, Thrive Consulting Group and Co-Founder, Sum and Substance

Workplace Culture

Conscious Capitalism

Purpose

Conscious Leadership

Leadership Development

Storytelling

FOR BOOKINGS PLEASE CONTACT
Trisha Stezzi
(770) 490-5552
Trisha@SignificanceAgency.com

WE REPLY WITHIN 24 HOURS

Nathan Havey

Storytelling Event: “Sum and Substance”

Keynote & Workshop: “Four Drivers of Workplace Culture”

Keynote: “Conscious Capitalism”

Consulting: “Creating a Stage Five Purpose”

Workplace Culture, Conscious Capitalism, Purpose, Conscious Leadership, Leadership Development, Storytelling

Nathan Havey is the Founding Partner of Thrive Consulting Group, where he helps leadership teams fulfill their potential by building high performing cultures that employees love. Nathan's work with Biggby Coffee has the company on track to grow 10x in the coming decade and landed the Co-CEO's on the cover of the April 2018 issue of Conscious Company Magazine. Nathan is a conscious capitalism thought leader and a sought after speaker and facilitator on organizational purpose, workplace culture, and leadership development. 

Nathan is also the co-founder and host of Sum and Substance, a national storytelling event about purpose at work. It has hosted more than 100 storytellers at events in 14 cities and counting.  Companies like Marriott and Salesforce are using Sum and Substance to engage employees and reinforce their workplace culture.

Storytelling Event: “Sum + Substance”

Sum and Substance- speakers.png

Sum and Substance is a storytelling event about purpose at work.  It has hosted more than 100 storytellers at events in 14 cities and counting.  Companies like Marriott and Salesforce are using Sum and Substance to engage employees and reinforce their workplace culture.

Sum and Substance events feature stories from 4-6 storytellers who have been selected and trained for that event. In 7 minutes, they each share a real and vulnerable story of purpose at work and conclude with a challenge for the audience, one thing that they believe the rest of us ought to try to deepen the meaning of our careers.  Sum and Substance Emcee Nathan Havey weaves a narrative through the stories to make the case for fully engaging at work to help companies reach their full potential and to discover our own. Sum and Substance helps people to see new and authentic ways to link personal aspirations with company goals. 

  • Corporate Culture: Much more than an inspiring event however, Sum and Substance is cutting-edge approach to corporate culture building.  The general themes presented in Sum and Substance events are rooted in psychologist Frederick Herzberg’s theories on employee motivation.  His 1968 article, One More Time: How Do You Motivate Employees? is still the most requested article in the Harvard Business Review.  Forty years later companies continue to struggle to engage employees, including Millennials, and Herzberg's theories are more relevant than ever.  Within this broad theme, events are tailored to advance the specific priorities of the host company culture. When a group of people can be honest about their own aspirations as well as the obstacles that are currently in the way of achieving them, it creates an opportunity for breakthrough results. 

  • Conference Event: Sum and Substance is cutting-edge approach to engagement for association members and conference audiences of all kinds.  Within this broad theme, events are tailored to advance the specific priorities of the conference host. The value of Sum and Substance Conference events is in the conversations they create. Sum and Substance helps people to get real with each other and deepen the connection to their fellow conference goers, heightening the conference experience overall.

“As a woman of color, this event made me feel seen, heard, and appreciated by Marriott. Thank you for promoting inclusion and diversity.”

 “I was so moved by all of the storytellers.  I really enjoyed this session and its sticking with me. Thank you so much!”

 “Organizers did a great job.  Speakers are telling true stories, and meaningful.”

Keynote & Workshop: “Four Drivers of Workplace Culture”

Based on Frederick Herzberg’s theory, updated for the modern workplace, and taught through relate-able examples, in Four Drivers of Workplace Culture, Nathan Havey presents a simple framework for diagnosing the strengths and weaknesses of a workplace culture.  The best workplace cultures provide employees with four key benefits.

Once a company’s performance in these areas is seen clearly, leadership can get far more specific in its efforts to learn how to build a great culture and thereby a great company.  Best of all, companies of all sizes can learn to deliver these key cultural benefits without spending much (if any) money.  Many companies even save money as they stop providing expensive programs and perks that don’t move the needle.

Audience Reactions:

  • Tangible things we can take back to the workplace and implement immediately.”

  • “Really action-focused, not a bunch of theory.”

  • “Came in feeling defeated, leaving feeling inspired.”

  • “Lively, fast moving, and packed with great information.”

  • “Absolutely amazing. I wish this could have been longer. Best speaker of the day.”

  • “This was a "wow" presentation. I absolutely loved it. There are so many things I will implement in my organization. Thank you!”

Keynote: “Conscious Capitalism”

Over the 15 years from 1998 to 2013, a group of 18 public companies outperformed the S&P 500 by more than 14 to 1.  Over that period, these companies eclipsed the performance of even the storied “Good to Great” companies by more than 6 to 1.  The study of how these companies achieved such incredible performance is detailed in the book Firms of Endearment and later became the four pillars of the international business movement called Conscious Capitalism. Nathan Havey is the Founding Partner of Thrive Consulting Group and one of the thought leaders in this movement.

In his 1 hr keynote on Conscious Capitalism, Nathan introduces audience to the inspiring ideas of Conscious Capitalism in an approachable, engaging and ultimately implementable way.  His vivid examples are applicable to leaders of organizations large and small in every industry and sector of the economy.

“A great event, great vision, a movement worth being involved in Excellent presentation – connects the “what” and the “how.” Nathan was truly inspiring Incredibly informative and inspirational.”

Consulting: “Creating a Stage Five Purpose”

Nathan Havey has identified five stages of organizational purpose - and the key difference for most organizations is between a Stage 4, and a Stage 5.

 Stage 4 // Good Citizen - Take measures to have a net-positive impact

At this stage, a company would like to produce a net-positive return for society through its operations. These companies encourage employee volunteerism, contribute toward a wide range of charitable concerns, and usually strive to create an enjoyable workplace culture. These businesses recognize that investing in social capital and goodwill creates important returns.

Stage 5 // Conscious Company - Embody a specific, measurable purpose beyond profit

At this stage, a company is aware of its power to achieve a specific, important purpose beyond profit, and designs its culture and operations to leverage everything at its disposal to fulfill that mission. Growth and profit remain important, but no longer for their own sake. Now they are a necessary factor of achieving the purpose.

For those organizations that want to become an engine for real and lasting impact, Thrive Consulting Group has developed a process to help you get there.  All it takes is getting your team aligned on the answers to seven key questions.  It’s that simple, but it is not easy.