Millennial & Gen Z Research & Infographics

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Millennials Research Document Excerpts

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Dollars & Change: Young People Tap Brands As Agents of Social Change - 2019 Report on Young People and Social Change by DoSomething Strategic

“Gen Z is forcing brands to ask not just “what do we stand for?” but “how do we live that every day at every touch-point with our employees and customers?”

"You can’t limit your cause engagement to the purchase — only 34% of respondents feel that their purchases “make an impact when the brand supports a cause I believe in.” To build deep, lasting connections with young people (read: your primary customer base for the next 40 years) you must engage them directly in impactful work."

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"76% of young people said they have purchased (53%) or would consider purchasing (23%) a brand/product to show support for the issues the brand supported. But perhaps even more importantly — and more costly — 67% have stopped purchasing (40%) or would consider doing so (27%) if the company stood for something or behaved in a way that didn’t align to their values. With new customer acquisition costs anywhere between five and 25 times more expensive than retaining an existing one, businesses simply can’t afford to ignore these numbers! Compare that to only 29% and 32%, respectively, of respondents who have contacted a representative or attended a political event. If they can’t impact policy with their vote, they’ll vote with their dollars."

"Where politicians and politics increasingly let them down, Gen Z is expecting — demanding even — that brands use their platforms for good."

"Everyday acts like grabbing a fried chicken sandwich from Chick-Fil-A or a pint of Ben & Jerry’s are now political statements and social action. And young people are the vanguard of this change."

"Almost 30% actively seek out socially or environmentally responsible brands and 26% say they often or always decide to purchase solely because they support the brand’s values. The numbers are even higher for people of color."

"To truly stand out, companies must engage with young people and make them partners in progress."

"In our 2017 Brand Love & Ad Nausea report, nearly 60% of young people believed that a brand’s ads should include the company’s values and beliefs. And don’t be afraid to blow your own saxophone — as we previously noted in that same report, only 11% of young people actively seek information on a brand’s social, environmental or political position, employee diversity, or the causes it supports."

"You can’t limit your cause engagement to the purchase — only 34% of respondents feel that their purchases “make an impact when the brand supports a cause I believe in.” To build deep, lasting connections with young people (read: your primary customer base for the next 40 years) you must engage them directly in impactful work."

"Nearly half of our respondents say that it is important for a company or brand to have a social change initiative that consumers can be a part of. Now on the surface, this may not seem like a significant percentage, but really consider what they’re saying. Forty-nine percent want to be an active partner with you. That’s an opportunity to tie yourselves together in a way that rarely presents itself."

"Gen Z is forcing brands to ask not just “what do we stand for?” but “how do we live that every day at every touch-point with our employees and customers?”



The Change Generation(TM) Report - How Millennials and Generation Z are Redefining Work The Change Generation

"Generation Z has grown up in a connected world with instant information access. This has made them more aware of global crisis and economic challenges. Born with the same innate desire to have purpose, Generation Z seek meaningful work that aligns with their passion and will create impact. Having witnessed the employment struggles of Millennials however, Generation Z exhibits caution and prioritizes their personal growth and success. This is a generation that knows what they want and are driven to seize opportunities to step up their game to achieve it."

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"Top Take-Aways"

  1. "Entrepreneurial Minded About 75% of Millennials and Generation Z indicate they already have or may consider starting a business."
  2. "Seek Mentorship & Support The biggest obstacles noted for starting a business are start-up costs, finding customers and lack of know-how. Access to capital, business mentors and entrepreneurship ecosystems will be key for enabling youth-led innovation and career growth."
  3. "Success Driven While initial salary expectations are fairly reasonable, Generation Z showed higher expectations for their future success than Millennials. In other words, Generation Z may willing to put in the work to grow their skills and develop their career, but they are more driven to succeed and accelerate their career progression."
  4. "Socially Conscious Both generations emphasize the importance of ethics and values in the workplace. Indicative of their desire for meaningful work, Millennials and Generation Z seek employers with aligned missions and corporate social responsibility."
  5. "Value Personal Development Both Millennials and Generation Z seek opportunities to learn and grow. While Millennials prefer training and career support, Generation Z’s desires consider well-being with a demand for better mental health support from employers."
  6. "Prioritize Quality of Life Neither generation is focused primarily on wealth. Both Millennials and Generation Z define career success in terms of work-life balance and meaningful work."
  7. "Experience Focused The lines between work-life and personal continue to fade. Both Millennials and Generation Z seek interesting work and opportunities for learning and development."
  8. "Guided By Passion One of the biggest shifts between generations is Generation Z’s emphasis on passion in their work and career success. For the first time, passion is ranked as one of the top 3 work values. Employers will be required to keep their spark alive in the workplace - ensuring work speaks to individual interests, provides growth and aligns with employee values."
  9. "Want Meaningful Work Salary alone will not recruit or retain Generation Z. In stark comparison to previous generations, Generation Z doesn’t even include salary as one of their top 3 work values. They are most likely to quit instead because of poor work-life balance, disconnect with their passion and low job security. This is a generation that values stability, balance, and opportunities to grow their passion."

Cause, Influence & The Workplace - The Millennial Impact Report Retrospective: Five Years of Trends - The Case Foundation

Achieve, sponsored by the Case Foundation, has studied the behavior and attitudes of millennials
(those born 1980-2000) since 2009. In analyzing five years of research data, we identified six common findings:
1. Intrinsic passion for a cause is millennials’ primary motivator.
2. Millennials volunteer and give modestly to multiple causes in early engagement.
3. Among millennials, women give more money than men, and older individuals more
than younger ones; larger donations correlate with higher total volunteer hours.
4. Peers are a critical influence on millennial giving.
5. Millennials want to use and develop their skills through cause engagement.
6. Millennials learn about and donate to causes digitally, using each platform distinctly.

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Millennials—people born between 1980 and 2000— are replacing baby boomers as consumers and coworkers. The potential influence of this new segment of our population cannot be overstated. Millennials make up the nation’s largest living generation. Already at 75.4 million, their numbers are expected to peak in 2036 at 81.1 million, surpassing the baby boomers’ highest peak by nearly 3 million (U.S. Census Bureau, April 2016).

We know that their baby boomer parents grew up in a time where consumers tended to remain at the same job or company and support the same institutions for many years. Millennials, however, have taken advantage of the personal and professional opportunities afforded by a global economy and digital connectivity. They travel more, buy more, change jobs more, obtain more education, develop relationships far differently and share more personal information than any previous generation.

Analysis of the research as a whole brought us to the following key conclusions:

  • Millennial engagement in causes is moving from cursory interest to activism, reflecting a maturation of the generation’s inherent desire to do good.
  • Millennial engagement with causes will expand as this generation ages and as causes learn to connect with individuals more effectively.
  • Millennial preferences in cause engagement will alter current models of giving and views on how to effect change in the world.

In analyzing five years of research data, we identified six common findings:

1. Intrinsic passion for a cause is millennials’ primary motivator. In 2015:

31% gave to a company-sponsored program due to passion about the cause/issue

29% participated in workplace volunteering due to passion about the cause,

8% due to an incentive; overall, 79% felt they made a difference

43% would be more likely to give if part of a competition

31% who gave to a workplace campaign said employer matched a portion of the gif t

13% gave to a workplace campaign because of a matching gif t

56% of employees and 51% of managers would be more likely to volunteer if incentivized

69% of employees and 77% of managers would be more likely to give if their company matched that gift

2. Millennials volunteer and give modestly to multiple causes in early engagement. In 2015:

72% volunteered in past year

84% gave to nonprofit in past year

67% gave up to $499

3. Among millennials, women give more money than men, and older individuals more than younger ones; larger donations correlate with higher total volunteer hours. In 2015:

Females volunteered 4% more than males

Females gave 3% more to company-sponsored cause campaigns than males

Females were 4% more likely than males to donate and 6% more likely to volunteer due to passion about the cause

Male managers are 6% more likely than females to donate when incentivized

4. Peers are a critical influence on millennial giving. In 2015:

22% gave in response to employer solicitations in past year

48% have donated to a workplace campaign in their lifetime

50% have volunteered for a company-sponsored initiative at some point in their career

45% of employees said some of their past year’s volunteer time was through company-of fered or -promoted opportunities

14% participated in workplace volunteering because a peer or coworker asked

46% were more likely to make a donation and 65% to volunteer if a co-worker asked and/or participated

27% would be more likely to make a donation and 44% to volunteer if a supervisor participated

21% would be more likely to donate if a CEO asked them

5. Millennials want to use and develop their skills through cause engagement. In 2015:

25% of millennial employees volunteered through work to use their skills or expertise

77% would be more likely to volunteer if they could use their specific skills or expertise to benefit a cause

6. Millennials learn about and donate to causes digitally, using each platform distinctly. In 2015:

30% donated through an online/mobile platform other than the organization’s website

FIVE-YEAR SUMMARY CONCLUSIONS

Millennial engagement in causes is moving from cursory interest to activism, reflecting a maturation of the generation’s inherent desire to do good.

Millennial engagement with causes will expand as this generation ages and as causes learn to connect with individuals more effectively.

Millennial preferences in cause engagement will alter current models of giving and views on how to effect change in the world.




2016 Millennial Employee Engagement Study - The Millennial Way  -  Cone, Inc.

Millennials are becoming a force to be reckoned with in the workplace. This group is the largest generation in the workforce and, by 2020, will make up 50% of the employees in the United States. But don’t think it’s business as usual – Millennials are coming to work seeking greater purpose and involvement in their company’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) commitments. Whatever their job descriptions may say, they want to know they are making a difference and they expect their employers to show them the way.

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Whatever their jobs may be, Millennials want to make a difference at work.

  • 64% won't work for a company that doesn't have strong CSR commitments (vs. 51% U.S. average)
  • 76% consider a company's CSR commitments when deciding where to work (vs. 58% U.S. average)
  • 75% would choose to work for a responsible company, even for less money (vs. 55% U.S. average)
  • would be more loyal to a company that helps them contribute to social or environmental issues (vs. average)
  • 88% say their job is more fulfilling when they can make a positive impact on issues (vs. average)
  • Less than 1/3 say they are engaged at work
  • 44% expect to leave their current job within two years
  • 1/4 would quit today
  • 88% want employers to share details of CSR commitments
  • 85% want opportunities to help employers reach CSR goals
  • 89% want to provide feedback, ideas and solutions to improve CSR efforts
  • 89% want hands-on activities around environmental responsibility in the workplace
  • Are more likely to learn and share via social: 79% Millennials vs. 55% average want employers to share employee engagement info over social media. 76% Millennials vs. 52% average want to share photos, videos and experiences on their personal social networks. 75% Millennials vs. 48% average would use designated corporate hashtags to share.



The Deloitte Millennial Survey 2016

Millennials, in general, express little loyalty to their current employers and many are planning near-term exits, according to Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited’s fifth annual Millennial Survey. This remarkable absence of allegiance represents a serious challenge to any business employing a large number of Millennials, especially those in markets—like the United States—where Millennials now represent the largest segment of the workforce. However, because most young professionals choose organizations that share their personal values, it’s not too late for employers to overcome this “loyalty challenge.” Deloitte surveyed nearly 7,700 Millennials from 29 countries during September and October 2015 to learn more about Millennials’ values and ambitions, drivers of job satisfaction, and their increasing representation in senior management teams.

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87% believe that “the success of a business should be measured in terms of more than just its financial performance.

When asked to state the level of influence different factors have on their decision making at work, “my personal values/morals” ranked first. Over half (55 percent) said this had a very high degree of influence, with “personal goals and ambitions and career progression” (51 percent) ranking second. “Meeting the organization’s formal targets or objectives” ranked only fifth of the seven factors measured.

This year’s survey results suggest Millennials don’t see their organizations as reflecting the core values they believe to lie behind long-term success—resulting in a significant gap between where Millennials believe emphasis should be placed and what they perceive to be the case.

There are five key areas where Millennials believe businesses’ sense of purpose should be far greater than is currently the case. These areas include: improving the skills, income, and “satisfaction levels” of employees; creating jobs; and impacting positively on users of their goods and services.

Diametrically opposed is the emphasis on profit and business expansion. These sentiments are consistent with the results from last year’s survey. Then, we identified a “leadership gap”— differences between the priorities Millennials would have if they led their organizations and where they believed their senior leadership teams to be focused.

The link between Millennials’ loyalty and their feelings about business are not a coincidence. Thus, those organizations that “do the right thing” may be less likely to lose their Millennial employees. Our survey provides some ideas as to how this “brain drain” can be arrested, with three key actions suggesting themselves:

  • Identify, understand, and align with Millennials’ values;
  • Satisfy the demands Millennials have of employers; and
  • Support Millennials’ ambitions and professional development



2015 Cone Communications Millennial CSR Study

From buying products associated with a cause they care about to using their online networks to amplify social and environmental messages, Millennials are universally more engaged in corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts, according to the newly released 2015 Cone Communications Millennial CSR Study. The study, the most comprehensive snapshot of how Millennials engage with CSR efforts in the U.S., reveals more than nine-in-10 Millennials would switch brands to one associated with a cause (91% vs. 85% U.S. average) and two-thirds use social media to engage around CSR (66% vs. 53% U.S. average). The study examines the unique attitudes, perceptions and behaviors of different Millennial segments, including the young
Millennial, mature Millennial, Millennial female, Millennial male, affluent Millennial and Millennial mom. 

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New Cone Communnications research confirms Millennials as America's most ardent CSR supporters, but marked differences revealed among this diverse generation. Life-stage, gender and other key factors impact how different Millennial audiences will engage in CSR.

“This research reiterates the significant differences in how gender, life-stage and income level impact how Millennials want to be engaged in CSR efforts,” says Lisa Manley, executive vice president, CSR Strategy, Cone Communications. “With different priorities and drivers, a ‘one-size-fits-all’ message won’t inspire mass action within this generation. To appeal to a diverse Millennial audience, businesses need to understand the unique drivers and preferences of each segment to tailor their content, communications and channels for greatest impact.” Millennials Willing to Take Action to Support CSR Millennials are more fervent in their support of corporate social and environmental efforts and are, above and beyond, more likely to say they would participate in CSR initiatives if given the opportunity. This enthusiastic group is more willing to:

  • Purchase a product with a social or environmental benefit (87% vs. 83% U.S. average)
  • Tell friends and family about CSR efforts (82% vs. 72% U.S. average)
  • Voice opinions to a company about its CSR efforts (70% vs. 60% U.S. average)
  • Volunteer for a cause supported by a company they trust (74% vs. 56 % U.S. average)

Yet, Millennials are also prepared to make personal sacrifices to make an impact on issues they care about – whether that’s paying more for a product (70% vs. 66% U.S. average), sharing products rather than buying (66% vs. 56% U.S. average) or taking a pay cut to work for a responsible company (62% vs. 56% U.S. average).

Millennials Use Social Media to Amplify for Impact

Millennials, as digital natives, believe social media can be their megaphone to make an impact on issues they care about.

This group is far more likely to use social media to address or engage with companies around social and environmental issues (66% vs. 53% U.S. average). Although most Millennials turn to social channels to share and learn, there is also a portion that uses this medium as an avenue to participate in a direct dialogue with companies or contribute to CSR efforts:

  • 38% share positive information about companies and issues they care about (vs. 30% U.S. average)
  • 33% learn more about specific companies and issues (vs. 27% U.S. average)


Infographics